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Our Top 10 Favorite White Flowers

Posted By Ashleigh Bethea on Aug 25, 2016 | 0 comments


In a world buzzing with constant clamor, movement and colors sometimes the best reprieve is silence, stillness, and nothingness. White flowers symbolize peace, fidelity, innocence, honesty and perfection. They deserve a place in our gardens beyond formal events like weddings and funerals. White is not a canvas to be filled, but an absence that makes the heart grow fonder.

ice wings dafodil

Ice Wings Daffodil

With petals so pale they look like they will melt away at the lightest touch, these daffodils are a breathtaking sight in springtime. They have all of the charming shapeliness of their yellow sisters, and their pure white petals bring out their lemony yellow stamen and handsome green stems wonderfully.

White ice age tulipIce Age Tulip

This tulip is such a fresh shade of white you’ll feel cooler just looking at it! When I marvel at the amazing fluffiness of their double blooms I imagine that these flowers were once a cloud that fell to earth and liked the view so much it decided to put down roots.

climbing roseHoneymoon Arborose Climbing rose

A miracle of nature, the Honeymoon Arborose has us completely smitten. It climbs like a champion and sports the faintest blush of pink at its center as if it hears our many compliments and is a bit embarrassed by all the attention.

henry clematisHenryi Clematis 

Another eager climber, this clematis can’t wait for summer to come so it can rush up fences and drench them in its large silky blooms. Henryi wears its spiky stamen like a gold and ruby encrusted crown while its handsome foliage forms a verdant robe highlighting the clean paleness of its petals.

charlies white peonyCharlie’s White Peony 

Each of this bulbous perennial’s 8″ double blooms are like a burst of whipped cream turning this classic flower into dessert for the eyes! Curly central petals end in a light vanilla color adding to its visual sweetness. As spring wanes into summer this paeonia will be there to lift your spirits on radiant clouds of white.

White pristine mountain laurelPristine Mountain Laurel 

The pearly blooms of this evergreen shrub gather like stars into bunches that are just begging to be added to a corsage. Expect these bright constellations to stick around for a while – they bloom for months!

White snow pearl azaleaSnow Pearl Azalea 

We Southerners don’t get much in the way of snow, but that’s alright – we grow our own! This azalea boasts delicate and moonlit blooms that absolutely flood the shrub over the course of spring and into summer. They smell heavenly, look fantastic and can bear the southern sun with grace. Who needs a winter storm when you can have a warm weather blizzard of blooms?

chuck hayes camelliaChuck Hayes Gardenia 

Spend the summer season basking in the moon-like glow of these magnificent flowers. I admit I’ve a soft spot for Gardenias; their soothing rosy shape and delectable scent get me every time. Durability is important to me as well so this variety with its added tolerance to heat and cold is especially appealing.  Looking and smelling like a vanilla milkshake, this gardenia is one sweet summer treat you can enjoy without guilt.

incredible 3Incrediball Hydrangea 

Huge! Enormous! Colossal! You’ll soon run out of words to describe the magnitude of this hydrangea’s sizable blooms. These impressive flower puffs start our a delicate green but soon brighten to a very becoming shade of eggshell. If humongous globes of white blooms set upon sturdy stems is your thing then Incrediball is your best choice.

japanese snowbellFragrant Fountain Japanese Snowbell 

A truly astonishing shrub, this weeping beauty covers itself in literally thousands of fragrant, crystal white blooms each spring and summer creating a fountain of white so phenomenal you have to see it to believe it. This jaw-dropping display offers a rich fragrance and beauty that lasts for months and is so floriferous you might forget it has foliage until its leaves turn golden in the fall.

 

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