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4 Vines for Vertical Garden Interest

Posted By Maria Walker on Oct 18, 2019 | 0 comments


Flowering vines can be a stunning way to add visual interest to both your garden and home. Many vines attract hummingbirds and butterflies and can be fragrant and colorful. Too often we think of our gardens as a horizontal landscape when the possibilities for vertical gardening are just as important. Here are four amazing climbing vines to bring vertical interest to your garden!  

Lonicera (Honeysuckle)

Honeysuckle is easy to grow, heat tolerant, and are virtually indestructible! Lonicera vines not only bloom in various bright colors but are also deliciously fragrant and can attract hummingbirds and butterflies all summer long. You can grow honeysuckle along a trellis, arbor, or fence or even choose to grow it without support as groundcover to control erosion. Honeysuckle will fill your garden with delicate flowers and a sweet summer breeze scent.  

Climbing Roses

Climbing Roses are a popular classic and remind us of a traditional cottage garden. These roses are incredibly versatile and vigorous climbers you can use them across your landscape! They can transform bare fences and walls into show stopping focal points. They typically have large blooms and can repeat bloom. Use a climbing rose to turn an ordinary wall into a burst of beautiful classic roses.  

Clematis

No garden is complete without the dazzling blooms and climbing habits of Clematis. Plant them around a sunny boarder, a vertical structure for climbing, or a horizontal expanse for meandering the Clematis makes a gorgeous statement. Pair it with the climbing roses above for unparalleled summer beauty or design a large planting of several different types of Clematis varieties for large display of color. Make sure you are correctly pruning your Clematis vines based on its blooming habit, because improper pruning can set your blooms show back a year or more. Follow our easy guide on our website.

 Wisteria

It is hard to find a more beautiful vine than Wisteria, the fragrant blue violet or lavender blooms hang gently in the breeze all through spring. The long racemes drape down from soft green head of foliage, the effect is graceful and beautiful. Once established, Wisteria grows vigorously and can cover arbors, pergolas, trellises, and walls.  

Vines can add so much visual interest to your home and garden. With proper care they can flourish with stunning beauty.  

Before you plant follow these tips to choose the best placement.  

  • Choose a sunny spot, most vines like the sun and won’t bloom in the shade.  
  • Are you afraid of (or allergic to) bees? If so, don’t plant a flowering vine over or on a doorway, arbor, mailbox, gazebo, or anyplace you’ll be near. Vines attract all kinds of sweet creatures including bees.  
  • If your house made of masonry or wood? Vines growing against wood siding can contribute to rot, be careful.  

Take all these tips into consideration, choose your vine type, and watch as it transforms your landscape.  

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