Skip to main content

Trees


Creating a Sensory Garden

Creating a Sensory Garden


Posted on Mar 31, 2017 | 0 comments

There’s an old joke that goes: “Gardening: Cheaper than therapy and you get tomatoes!” And while we  chuckle at this pithy saying, there’s a lot of truth to it. With the myriad worries of the world on our shoulders it’s only natural for us to want a brief escape from it all. Fortunately, your garden can be that escape when you have  just the right elements to make is so.

Read More
Grow a Japanese Garden

Grow a Japanese Garden


Posted on Feb 2, 2017 | 0 comments

It’s always fun to experiment with garden themes, and this week’s theme is Japanese gardening! From grasses to shrubs and trees, we’ve got all you need to sculpt your landscape into a masterpiece inspired by the Land of the Rising Sun.

Read More

A new year means new opportunities and we are already planning ways to get the best out of the next 365 days. One way to get a jump on your new garden is picking the perfect varieties to let your landscape stand out from the crowd. We at Wayside Gardens are proud to present our top picks to give your garden the greatest advantage in 2017.

Read More

Citruskumquatnagami
This weekend I bought a big bag of kumquats.  I had never actually tried one, though I’ve been fascinated by the little guys for years.  Not only is it one of the most fun fruit names to say, they’re like tiny, perfect little oblong oranges.  I was pretty sure that you’re supposed to eat the fruits whole, so I rinsed one off, popped it into my mouth and bit down, ready to savor the citrusy goodness.  Not, as it turns out, how you eat a Kumquat.  The taste of the pulp is much closer to that of a lemon than that of an orange (only even more tart), and when you just eat it like that the rind is very bitter.  To the internet I went, looking for the proper way to eat them (peeling them all seemed just too ridiculous to contemplate).  The trick, I discovered, is to roll the fruit between your fingers before eating to release the essential oils in the rind.  Then you need to chew thoroughly.  The sweetness of a kumquat is in the rind, and it needs to be chewed into the sour pulp.  Once you’ve got the trick down, though, it is an amazingly delicious, complex fruit.  Man, I remember thinking, wouldn’t it be amazing if I could grow fruit like this for myself?

It turns out that I can.  Wayside Gardens has several citrus trees that thrive in containers, so all of us can grow delicious citrus fruit almost anywhere in the country.  I might just grab up a Washington Navel Orange which will produce juicy, flavorful and nutritious fruits which all are sure to love.  Plus, it’s blooms are fragrant and the tree itself is handsome enough to become a living ornament indoors. If you’re looking to grow limes for Mexican cuisine or mixing drinks, you can’t go wrong with the seedless ‘Bearss’ Lime.  You also might consider the Meyer Lemon one of the most popular container citrus trees ever.

Read More