Skip to main content

Daylilies


4 Must-have Fall Flowers

4 Must-have Fall Flowers


Posted on Oct 3, 2017 | 0 comments

Fall is beautiful. It’s a veritable ‘second Spring’ where even the typically solemn trees burst into their brightest colors. Green turns to gold, crimson, amber, and plum while bushes sport shiny berries and fall flowers begin to flourish. It’s a wonderland of joy for your garden and we’re going to share with you some of our favorite stars of the season.

Read More

Do you ever look out at your garden and wish you had a fairy godmother (or at least her magic wand) to whisk away your planting pains? Espoma isn’t magic, but its products have an astounding effectiveness which is as close to bibbity-bobbity-boo as we’ve ever experienced. They’re a trusted name for a reason and now it’s time to see why.

Read More

As we gear up for spring, we gardeners are filled with that familiar ambivalent feeling—eager for the warm weather and beautiful blooms, but anxious about all the work we need to get done to get our garden started right! Don’t be caught off guard with the arrival of spring: follow this 8-step game plan to whip your garden into top shape by planting season!

Read More
Killer Plants: Ghastly Beauties

Killer Plants: Ghastly Beauties


Posted on Nov 11, 2015 | 0 comments

Ghouls and Goblins won’t kill you. But these killer plants could.

Many of the garden plants we grow for ornamental reasons got their vibrant, exotic colors as nature’s way of saying “Warning—Poison!” While most of these are innocuous enough sitting in pots or in the garden, if ingested they could cause illness of varying severity, and sometimes even death.

Read More

Dividing Irises and Daylilies


Posted on Aug 30, 2012 | 1 comment

The Labor Day holiday comes at the perfect time for busy gardeners! Bearded Irises should be divided every 2 to 3 years, and Daylilies need division every 3 to 5 years. Late summer is the best time to do this, so make a morning of it and do both at once!

WG Dividing IrisBearded Iris is very easy to dig up, because the rhizome sits at soil level. Carefully dig it up, keeping as many roots as possible, and wash it off. Then check the rhizome carefully for soft areas and small holes. Remove all of these undesirable areas with a sharp knife. Divide the remaining rhizome at its natural joints (shown at right with a red arrow). Trim the foliage back to about 6 inches, and re-plant the new rhizomes.

Like everything else about Daylilies, division is very simple! Just dig up the plant, taking care to keep as many of the roots intact as possible. Then plunge two garden forks back-to-back through the center of the plant and gently pull them apart, dividing the plant in two. Repeat until you have smaller clumps. Trim the foliage back to about 12 inches and re-plant the new clumps, hilling up the soil and fanning at the roots.

Now that you have many more new Bearded Iris and Daylily plants, you might consider creating an accent planting of just these two perennials. They both appreciate sunshine and good drainage, and bloom successively, with the Daylilies often encoring to keep the Irises company! This way you can dig up and divide the entire planting every 3 years, and keep your garden growing in beauty.

Read More